Have you thought about how to find decision makers using LinkedIn?

How to Find Decision Makers Using LinkedIn

Ekaterina Lepikhina Business

Everyone is always asking, “Do you have a LinkedIn account? Well, of course you do! All professionals ought to have a LinkedIn account. Not only is LinkedIn a good place to show off the accomplishments you have, it is also a place to connect with the decision maker of a company that you are looking to close. LinkedIn has over 400 million users and you need the right person to get you the job, or the sale. Here’s how to find decision makers using LinkedIn.

SEARCH OUT SPECIFIC JOB TITLES

Titles describe exactly what the person does in the company. C-level decision makers are often the ones that say “Yes!” and get you the deals. They are the ones that sign off on purchasing your product for the company to use and are often well-connected with the rest of the industry. To find decision makers using LinkedIn is quite easy because LinkedIn provide it for you using the search tool.

LinkedIn Search for Targeting Decision Maker

You use the LinkedIn Search bar in targeting your next connection

LinkedIn allows for you to search for these people specifically within your network and see who you may have as a connection. This connection can then introduce you to the decision maker and open the door to showing them the value of the product you represent.

SEARCH JOB FUNCTION AND SENIORITY

Each user usually provides a robust listing of their job function within a company. Their profiles allow you to glean into what the person’s position in the company and the amount of leverage he or she may have when it comes to making a decision. A manager that has been with the company for 5 years will know more about the its needs than a new hire. They may also know a lot about who is who within the company and your relationship with that person can get you to the big guy with the checkbook. You can find decision makers using LinkedIn simply by typing in the job function they fulfill. They can be managers, directors, or chief of something.

Executive Assistants that know the day to day happenings in the company are great leads to the decision maker. Many companies trust their assistants opinions and the longer that person has been in that position, the deeper the trust.

to find decision makers using Linked, these four methods usually come together.

Using all four tactics allow for you to find the decision maker. Image from B2Linked

CHECK FOR SKILLS

The way to find decision makers using LinkedIn is by looking for skills you know they have. Every salesman worth their salt knows that they need to check for skills.  Skills validate your connection strengths and provide an area of common interest that you can discuss. Skill endorsements are a simple and effective way of engaging your network.

The low skill endorsement may mean that you need to work extra on explaining the value of your product. A high endorsement may mean that they are familiar with the solution your product answers. Either way, they let you know how to prepare for a face-to-face with the decision maker and how to approach them.

FIND DECISION MAKERS USING LINKEDIN GROUPS

Find decision makers using LinkedIn and end with a handshake.

A firm handshake closes the deal.

LinkedIn is a great place to promote your expertise in an area. Most group members post and answer questions in the group and that allows for them to build traction within the community as a thought leader. Building up this rapport makes connecting with someone in that group happen more organically. Because of your expertise, your connection now feels comfortable setting you up with the decision maker.

Each of these ways helps foster your relationship with people and have proven to enrich the sales experience by providing genuine friendships, not just a business transaction, with every deal that you close. Allow us to optimize your LinkedIn experience by contacting Tractus and close those deals with a firm handshake.

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